Neetal Parekh

Founder of Innov8Social, authoring a book on social entrepreneurship, attorney by education. Curious always.

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Dating for Apps

Is it just me or do we think there are a lot of dating apps and websites out there? I mean these days you can swoon, meet an appetizing bagel or coffee, say ok to cupid, match, find (e)harmony, scout, tinder, zoosk, or digitally ponder if “we” should do something together—from the convenience of your mobile device, and all before breakfast.

So, full disclaimer, I have dabbled in the wonderful world of online relationship searching in the past. But, by now my worldwide web modalities of choice are probably considered “old school” in the face of newer, [number of choice].0 offerings. I have yet to try out some of the cutting edge developments in mate-matching (which, incidentally, could double as a moniker for a new app.)

So I look into the circus, or cirque de soleil, if you will, from the lens of someone who has been to a performance a long time ago. And I wonder a few things:

1. Is

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On Failure

If there’s one thing you’ve got to love about Silicon Valley, it is the embracing of failure. I know and love this because I fail early and often—well at at least often any way. I like to mix up my failures, diversifying them like investments in a well-balanced portfolio. Sometimes I’ll choose to fail at something that requires studying, other times I’ll fail at something that requires coordination, and still at other times I’ll just fail at something brand new.

failure is great

As you might suspect, I wasn’t born loving failure—but it’s one of those things that can just wear you down grow on you. So it makes sense that I have formed more than a secret crush on the SF Bay area. People here fail because they try things out of their comfort zones, and I seem to do that instinctively.

And so this romance with Silicon Valley would have continued blossoming into perhaps a relationship, or

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Humorist me

There are traditional venues for humor. Sitcoms with laugh tracks, stand up routines with live audiences, and perhaps the mere entry of a jovial uncle can subconsciously cue your mind and body to oncoming humor. You might allow your muscles to relax, let ease take over.

And the benefits of laughter are well-documented. Crack a giggle or guffaw unabashedly and you might be in for decreased stress levels, improved blood pressure and flow, better glycemic recovery, pain relief au natural, and even a friendly spike in the immune system.

But what about humor in the abstract. Like when we say in no uncertain terms, “oh, that’s funny” without actually laughing. Are the benefits retained? If our mind registers humor without physically acting on it, do we get full points– or is it the equivalent of phoning it in?

I pose this question because I haven’t found enough evidence to support a bet

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